Facebook

New research shows the effect of therapy on stuttering

It has been proven in research over the past fifteen years or so that speech therapy can improve the speech of people who stutter. The use of brain imagery through PET scans and other methods by researchers has shown that there are changes in the brain’s activity directly after therapy, and stuttering behaviour has been reduced. But a recent study has shown that there is a change in brain patterns even after just one week of treatment.

Read more...

The Australian Stuttering Research Centre addresses social phobia

The Australian Stuttering Research Centre, located at Sydney University, is developing a program to treat social phobia in people who stutter. The developed treatment, a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) program, will include online therapy.

Mark Onslow, the foundation director and a famous figure in stuttering treatment and research, explains that although stuttering is a physical disorder, the social anxiety that is sometimes created by it is not always addressed or treated by a speech therapist.

Read more...

Article Review: Changing adolescent attitudes toward stuttering

teens

This is a summary and review, not a republishing, of the article "Changing adolescent attitudes toward stuttering", by Ken St. Louis and Timothy Flynn. From the Journal of Fluency Disorders, 2011, 110-121.

This review was originally published in the 2011 Winter edition of CSA Voices.

This article provides an excellent overview of how a survey technique, the International Project on Attitudes towards Human Attributes (IPATHA), can be used to determine the results of public education efforts aimed at improving attitudes toward stuttering.

Read more...

Research Update: Fluency and time perception

This article was originally published in the winter 2011 issue of CSA Voices.

Are the brains of people who stutter bad timekeepers?

stopwatch

“I do not understand...the lateral movement of time. A clock ticks in an orderly fashion...My urge is always to telescope time into itself... and speed it up. People with a normal sense of time can count “one, two, three, four, five” systematically. I on the other hand, would count out five as ‘one, two threefourfive’ ”
Marty Jezer, Stuttering: a Life Bound up in Words

Read more...

Research update: Bird songs shed light on stuttering

The zebra finch is a rare bird in that its full genome has been mapped by geneticists. Remarkably, this has led to advances in stuttering research. The findings revealed that a substantial part of the genome of the finch is for the purpose of hearing and singing bird songs. This made the bird a candidate for further study, as its song “language” is remarkably similar to human language in certain respects.

Read more...

Pagoclone Study not Promising

After many years of testing, the drug Pagoclone, believed to reduce stuttering in some people, is still not available for general use, and might never be. As reported by Tom Weidig on his blog, Endo Pharmaceuticals is closing the initial phase of testing according to their website, with no plans to put it on the market any time soon. They are starting a new phase of testing next year. As it stands, things do not look promising for development of a stuttering-reduction drug.

Gerald A. Maguire, MD, is an Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, the Kirkup Chair in Stuttering, admitted during a talk at the National Stuttering Association conference in Cleveland, that the current testing phase was over.

More information on this subject will be posted on this site in the future.

Become a Member!

Support the Canadian Stuttering Association by becoming a member. Get updates and receive our upcoming monthly newsletter.

Fill out the Membership Form today!