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CSA Annual General Meeting, March 28

All Canadian Stuttering Association members are invited to our AGM and introductory workshop on Saturday March 28 at 1pm in Toronto, Ontario at Metro Hall, King and John Streets. So we can know how many to expect, please register in advance for this event.

Before the meeting, there is a special event at 10:00 am with guest speaker Margo Gouley of the Humphrey Group. She will lead this interactive workshop "Speaking as a Leader." There is no charge for either event, but please register.

There’s much to get involved in and we welcome your ideas, particularly on the possibility of another mini-confernece in Toronto this year and a CSA national conference next year.

Call for Research Participants

research IconThe Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario is looking for people who stutter to participate in a study that investigates how they process auditory feedback while speaking. For more information go to the website or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. the lab. From the Jones Lab centre's website: "We conduct a wide range of studies on speech communication, singing, musicianship, and decision making. We study both healthy individuals as well as individuals who are challenged by communication disorders."

"Out With It" published in Japanese!

booksSince Katherine Preston published her memoir in 2013 about growing up with the challenges of stuttering, Out With It has touched countless readers the world over. A Japanese translator who is also a person who stutters was so moved by her book that she wanted to make sure people of her nation could read and enjoy it. Katherine says on her blog, "Thanks to the incredible translation work of Eri Tsuji and the publishing efforts of Tokyo Shoseki, Out With It is now available in Japan!"  

Read more...

A leap in genetic research into stuttering

zebrafinchScientists observed long ago that the singing behavior of birds had similarities with human speech. The ability to learn vocal expression is unique to humans, and, it was noted, certain song birds such as the zebra finch.  Now Dr. Erich Jarvis, an associate professor of neurobiology at the Duke University Medical School is just one of the researchers further studying this area, and making significant discoveries, such as the fact that birds and humans use essentially the same genes to speak. After identifying the genes responsible for speech defects, it may be possible in the future to repair speech and other disorders.

More info:

Phys.org
National Geographic
MIT News

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