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My Journey from a Student Who Stutters to a Teacher Who Stutters

scott-kerby Scott Kerby
This article was originally published in the Spring 2009 issue of the CSA Newslettert

When I think of my chosen profession, and how it came to be, I see that being a person with a mild to severe stutter has played an important role in defining who I am and what I chose to do as an occupation. For the past twelve years, I have been teaching in the public school system, and currently, I’m a Special Education teacher at F.H. Collins high school in Whitehorse, Yukon. Before that, I was involved in instructing outdoor education and leadership programs based out of Toronto.

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Saying Farewell to the Role of CSA Coordinator

This article first appeared in the Fall 2009 issue of the CSA Newsletter

Shelli is a speech pathologist and a person who stutters. She became involved in the CSA to support other people who stutter by sharing her personal experiences, and to be a strong voice for people who stutter in Canada. She lives in Edmonton with her husband, Joe.

shelli teshima Shelli Teshima

Four years ago I was given an opportunity to be the national coordinator of the Canadian Stuttering Association. Upon reflection I realize that I did not know what I would be dealing with as coordinator, or what an impact the position would have on my life.

I thought I would lead a few meetings, send some emails, attend conferences and hopefully inspire others who stuttered to become involved in the CSA. Those would prove to be some of my tasks, but there were so many more duties that came my way and challenged me as a person who stutters.

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Stuttering and your career

panel members Panel Members

This article appeared in the Winter 2009 issue of the CSA Newsletter.

As people who stutter, we face challenges in the community, and in our careers. This article highlights presentations by five panelists at a Stuttering and Your Career workshop at the CSA national stuttering conference in Toronto on August 16-19, 2007. The workshop, chaired by Thomas Klassen, was held on Saturday, August 18, 2007.

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If I stutter, what help is out there for me?

This article first appeared in the Fall 2009 issue of the CSA Newsletter.

Jaan PillJaan PillMany treatment options are available for people who stutter. What follows are my personal opinions on this topic — based on my experiences, which may well differ from your own.My personal views do not represent the views of the Canadian Stuttering Association, of which I’m a co-founder. CSA neither endorses nor rejects any particular approach to dealing with stuttering.

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Baby steps to public speaking

This article first appeared in the Fall 2009 issue of the CSA newsletter.

I am active in the podcasting community where everyone is encouraged to give presentations at conferences. I was eager to participate since my early days in the podcasting community, but having stuttered all my life, I automatically wrote that idea off as “I could never be able to do that”.

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Genetic Roots to Stuttering

Feb. 10, 2010 - The New England Journal of Medicine has published an article exploring why people stutter. The article's authors have found that three genetic mutations in the brain cells of stutterers could be the root cause. The mutations, to paraphrase Dr. Dennis Drayna, a researcher at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, cause a disruption in the process of the cell that controls degradation of things that the cell does not need anymore. This discovery could lead to "more specific diagnosis and treatment".

http://www.cnn. com/2010/ HEALTH/02/ 10/stuttering. genes.cell/

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/MindMoodNews/stuttering-genes-lead-speech-condition/story?id=9802285

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